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Beyond Moore’s Law: taking transistor arrays into the third dimension

Thin film transistors stacked on top of a state-of-the-art silicon chip could help shrink electronics while improving performance.

Wireless Communication Under the Sea

U-M researchers have created a new means of enabling reliable wireless underwater communication, which could aid military, environmental, and conservation purposes.

Prof. Elaheh Ahmadi receives AFOSR Young Investigator Program award

Prof. Ahmadi will investigate promising new materials needed for an increasingly electrified world

Jamie Phillips named Director of the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

Phillips – who specializes in optoelectronic devices for next generation infrared detectors, solar cells, and thin film electronics – shares his goals for the 13,500 sq. ft. state-of-the-art cleanroom facility.

Two ‘U’ researchers receive Distinguished University Innovator Award

The Michigan Daily profiles Professors David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester, who are this year’s recipients of the 2019 Distinguished University Innovator Award.

Blaauw, Sylvester are 2019 Distinguished University Innovators

Pioneering computer technology that is spurring innovation and disruption across industries has earned David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester, professors of electrical engineering and computer science, this year’s Distinguished University Innovator Award.

Channel Coding for Next Generation 5G and Beyond

With the help of two NSF awards totaling $1.7m, Prof. Hessam Mahdavifar is tackling new problems to improve the reliability of communication systems for 5G and beyond.

The new quantum spurs action by the Michigan Quantum Science & Technology Working Group

The new working group showcased Michigan’s strength in Quantum Science at a workshop attended by researchers throughout the University of Michigan.

First programmable memristor computer aims to bring AI processing down from the cloud

Circuit elements that store information in their electrical resistances enable a brain-like form of computing, storing and processing information in the same place.

A high-efficiency GaAs solar cell to power the Internet of Tiny Things

The Michigan Micro Mote gets a new gallium arsenide solar cell for added power and adaptability.

SLAM-ming good hardware for drone navigation

Researchers built the first visual SLAM processor on a single chip that provides highly accurate, low-power, and real-time results.

Communicating with the world’s smallest computers

Researchers built the first millimeter-scale transmitter and antenna that can talk Bluetooth Low Energy with ease.

Biopsy alternative: “Wearable” device captures cancer cells from blood

New device caught more than three times as many cancer cells as conventional blood draw samples.

More efficient machine vision technology modeled on human vision

Prof. Robert Dick and advisee Ekdeep Singh Lubana developed a new technique that significantly improves the efficiency of machine vision applications

Toward brain-like computing: New memristor better mimics synapses

Competition and cooperation, which regulate the strengthening and weakening of connections in the brain, can now be modeled directly.

Miniature satellites to maximize global communication

Havel Liu is working on a project to revolutionize satellite systems, improving communications during natural disasters and providing a blueprint for receiving future interplanetary voicemails

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring

U-M researchers develop small device that bends light to generate new radiation

This device, the size of a match head, can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab.

It takes two photonic qubits to make quantum computing possible

Professors Ku and Steel are applying their expertise to take key next steps toward practical quantum computing

Conducting an orchestra of sensor nodes

Keeping time in the Internet of Things with frequency scaling

Solving impossible equations

Eric Michielssen has discovered a new way to rapidly analyze electromagnetic phenomena, and it’s catching on.

Blue Sky and Research Accelerator Initiatives fund solar fuel and high-power research

Memory-processing unit (MPU) could bring memristors to the masses

AI, weather forecasting and data science would all benefit from computers that store and process data in the same place. Memristors could be up to the task.

Beyond Moore’s law: $16.7M for advanced computing projects

DARPA’s initiative to reinvigorate the microelectronics industry draws deeply on Michigan Engineering expertise.

Michigan chips will be first to test next-generation hardware design tools

U-M team will serve as model for nimble and innovative system-on-chip design.

A new hybrid chip that can change its own wiring

The speedy and efficient system-on-chip could unify wireless communication.

Enabling anyone to design hardware with a new open-source tool

Six-month hardware design process will be turned into 24-hour automated task.

Hun-Seok Kim receives DARPA Young Faculty Award to advance research in IoT networks

Kim’s research is expected to impact the future design and wireless operation of the next generation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale.

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

With a bit of metal, nanoparticles shine in colors based on size.

Light could make semiconductor computers a million times faster or even go quantum

Electron states in a semiconductor, set and changed with pulses of light, could be the 0 and 1 of future “lightwave” electronics or room-temperature quantum computers.

Solar cells enable self-powered camera

A solar cell combined with a camera sensor collects photons to provide electricity.

Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cells

Buildings, clothing could generate power.

New quick-learning neural network powered by memristors

U-M researchers created a reservoir computing system that reduces training time and improves capacity of similar neural networks.

Seed-sized U-M computers pumped into oil wells featured at the Houston Museum of Natural Science

Millimeter-sized computers log the temperature and pressure from deep within oil wells.

U-M, Cavium partner on Big Data research computing platform

The new partnership will provide scalable storage and an analytic software framework available to all U-M researchers.

Cooling off with lasers

Lasers are typically thought of as hot. What if they were able to cool?

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists.

Next-gen computing inspired by biology

New memristor chips can see patterns over pixels.

Transparent Silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

A little silver goes a long way to improving touchscreens, displays, and much more

Michigan’s millimeter-scale computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Professors Blaauw and Sylvester showcase capabilities of tiny computing

Becky Peterson receives NSF CAREER Award for research in amorphous semiconductors for next generation electronics

In this project, Prof. Peterson will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures, in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices.

A fantastic voyage: ERC for WIMS

The first-ever Engineering Research Center in Wireless Integrated Microsensing and Systems has forged advances in many fields.

Ushering in the next generation of flat-panel displays and medical imagers

Prof. Kanicki expects breakthroughs in both the flat-panel display and imager industries using his-ITZO TFT technology in the near future.

The Michigan Probe: Changing the Course of Brain Research

Some believed early Michigan brain researchers were engaging in “science fiction” – until development of an advanced tool for forging breakthroughs proved them wrong.

Parag Deotare receives AFOSR Award for research in Nanoscale Exciton-Mechanical Systems (NEXMS)

Prof. Deotare’s work will deepen our understanding of the underlying physics of exciton-mechanics interactions and help engineer novel devices for energy harvesting and up-conversion.

Leaders in neuroscience look to the future

ICAN bring engineers and neuroscientists together to review the recent advancement in neurotechnology and neuroscience, define the need for next-generation tools, and enhance the translation of technology to the scientific community.

Injectable computers can broadcast from inside the body

This platform has enabled a variety of sensors that can fit inside the human body, made possible by several breakthroughs in ultra-low power computing.

Injectable computers

With a radio specifically designed to communicate through tissue, researchers from the Electrical and Computer Engineering are adding another level to a computer platform small enough to fit inside a medical grade syringe.

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program will bring together researchers from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain.

Making Memory Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger

Prof. Wei Lu and former student Dr. Sung Hyun Jo co-founded Crossbar, Inc. to tackle the physical limitations of conventional memory technology.

Lights Out

The power goes out. The aurorae stretch to the tropics. Could a major solar storm mean a year without electricity?

Emmett Leith

Inventor of Practical Holography

A better 3D camera with clear, graphene light detectors

While 3D films are currently made using multiple cameras to reconstruct each frame, this new type of camera could record in 3D on its own.

MBus is the missing interconnect for millimeter-scale systems

The M3 is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system.

Necmiye Ozay receives CAREER award for research in cyber-physical systems

Cyber-physical systems are smart, networked systems with embedded sensors, processors, and actuators that are designed to interact with the physical world.

Googling the physical world

PsiKick’s and other’s IoT applications are what many consider to be the next wave of computing and the next driving force of the semiconductor industry.

Mapping the brain: probes with tiny LEDs shed light on neural pathways

The new probes can control and record the activity of many individual neurons, and are believed to be the smallest implantable LEDs ever made.

$5M for international neurotechnology “dream team”

A “dream team” of experts in sensors, electronics, data analysis and neuroscience has been awarded a $5 million grant to help unravel the mysteries of the brain and cross-train a group of internationally-connected neuroscientists and engineers.

Layered graphene beats the heat

An international team of researchers, led by faculty at the University of Michigan, have found that a layered form of graphene can expel heat efficiently, which is an important feature for its potential applications in building small and powerful electronics.

New Michigan-Saudi Arabia collaboration promises exciting new research – beginning with the auto industry

KACST will provide manpower and will collaborate with Michigan faculty and students on their projects.

What makes cancer cells spread? New device offers clues

Why do some cancer cells break away from a tumor and travel to distant parts of the body? A team of oncologists and engineers from the University of Michigan teamed up to help understand this crucial question.

Mobile Friendly – apps to improve life

Technology continues to transform the health care industry, and researchers at the University have utilized mobile apps to expand the impact of their work.

Elnaz Ansari earns Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement

Her research interests include analog, digital, and mixed-signal designs.

Michigan Micro Mote (M3) makes history as the world’s smallest computer

A brief history of what led to the technical feat known as the Michigan Micro Mote, a tiny speck of a computer that does it all.

Prof. Wei Lu editor of new book – Semiconductor Nanowires: From Next-Generation Electronics to Sustainable Energy

The book is part of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Smart Materials series.

Student Spotlight: Kyusang Lee: A leader in flexible solar cell technology

Kyusang developed an innovative new fabrication technique to build lightweight, flexible devices not possible with conventional silicon.

Prof. Becky Peterson awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award to investigate new materials for power semiconductor devices

Peterson’s findings could be used in wireless sensing and actuation systems, including those that deal with monitoring of the environment and medical conditions.

Mapping the brain with lasers

Yoon is leading a team that will design new light sources with lasers capable of zooming in on individual neuron circuits within the brain.

Student Spotlight: Tal Nagourney – Exploring navigation

Tal is researching fabrication techniques for a micro rate-integrating gyroscope, using a vacuum mold and blowtorch.

Fighting lung cancer: Faster image processing for low-radiation CT scans

This advance could be important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment.

Wakefield and Kieras win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

The paper addresses how to manage multiple sources so that the user can maximize the information gained from each acoustic source.

Metal particles in solids aren’t as fixed as they seem, new memristor study shows

The findings show, for the first time, exactly how some memristors remember.

Leaders in ultra low power cicuits and systems presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

All of the research being presented focuses on getting the absolute best performance from the tiniest circuits, sensors, and electronic devices.

Thank Lynn Conway for your cell phone

She’s been called the “hidden hand” in the 1980s microchip design revolution that made today’s personal computers and smartphones possible.

New tech could lead to night vision contact lenses

The detector developed by University of Michigan engineering researchers doesn’t need bulky cooling equipment to work.

Transparent color solar cells fuse energy, beauty

The cells, believed to be the first semi-transparent, colored photovoltaics, have the potential to vastly broaden the use of the energy source.

Making the Internet of Things happen

Wentzloff aims to remove the necessity of a power outlet or even a battery to power miniature sensors.

Image processing 1,000 times faster is goal of new $5M contract

Lu plans to design and fabricate a computer chip based on so-called self-organizing, adaptive neural networks.

Faster, more powerful mobile devices: U-M startup Crossbar could disrupt the memory market

RRAM is a new form of nonvolatile memory that has the potential to replace the flash memory commonly used in tablets, digital cameras and solid-state drives.

When GPS fails, this speck of an electronic device could step in

The research group developed special fabrication processes that allows them to stack and bond seven different devices in layers.

A new laser paradigm: An electrically injected polariton laser

“It is no longer a scientific curiosity. It’s a real device.”

Advancing secure communications: A better single-photon emitter for quantum cryptography

The new device improves upon the current technology and is much easier to make.

Researchers funded to develop a leap forward in Processor Architectures

The project proposes to produce a parallel heterogeneous 3D near-threshold computing system with unprecedented energy efficiency.

Scientific Milestone: A room temperature Bose-Einstein condensate

A BEC is an unusual state of matter in which a group of boson particles can exist in a single quantum state, allowing scientists to observe novel quantum phenomena.

Next-Gen E-Readers: Improved peacock technology could lock in color for high-res displays

The research could lead to advanced color e-readers, more energy efficient electronic devices, and improved data storage and cryptography.

David Wentzloff receives CAREER Award for research in energy-autonomous systems

His research addresses critical needs in the area of wireless communication for the growing field of ubiquitous, energy-autonomous sensing devices.

Zhaohui Zhong receives CAREER Award for research in graphene-based optoelectronics

The use of graphene-based hot carrier optoelectronics is the key novelty of Prof. Zhong’s research.

Super-fine sound beam could one day be an invisible scalpel

“We believe this could be used as an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery,” Guo said. “Nothing pokes into your body, just the ultrasound beam.”

James McCullagh receives Best Student Paper Award for research to keep bridges safe

McCullagh is working to develop energy harvesting devices and circuits to power wireless sensor nodes which can monitor bridge health.

Seunghyun Lee takes the gold for all-graphene flexible and transparent circuit

Lee believes that graphene will play a pivotal role in realizing high speed, mechanically compliant, and transparent electronic systems in the future.

Nathan Roberts earns Best Paper Award for research to assist in remote patient monitoring

Roberts is helping to develop low-power sensor nodes that will be worn on the body to detect certain medical conditions.

Developing the wireless component for personalized health devices

The program aims to create wearable systems that monitor a person’s environment and health in search of connections between pollutants and chronic diseases.

Combining flexible, transparent electronics with high speed communications for the first time

Prof. Zhaohui Zhong and his team of graduate students have built the first flexible, transparent digital modulator for high speed communications.

UG Research Spotlight: Fred Buhler spends his summer improving circuit testing

The project involved designing new boards and writing test software, as well as writing software to control instruments and some integrated circuit design.

Nano-origami project combines art and engineering to further technology

With an origami-like approach, manufacturers could use existing machinery to make high-tech “paper” that can be folded into the desired device.

Student Research: Amit Patel earns prize in IEEE AP-S Student Paper Competition for antenna research

The method can be useful in the design of low-profile antennas integrated into body panels of vehicles.

Research Spotlight: Sensors and actuators for portable microsystems

Though a number of research challenges remain to realize the potential of microdischarge-based devices, the authors’ work demonstrates their promise.

Artificial synapses could lead to advanced computer memory and machines that mimic biological brains

“This hybrid circuit is a critical advance in developing intelligent machines.”

Next-generation computer memory firm receives U-Ms first startup investment

Crossbar is developing a new nonvolatile memory technology that will offer unprecedented density and power improvements in tomorrow’s electronics.

A smarter way to make ultraviolet light beams

The researchers have optimized an optical resonator to take an infrared signal from relatively cheap telecommunication-compatible lasers and boost it to an ultraviolet beam.

‘Perfect black’ coating can render a 3D object flat, raises intriguing dark veil possibility in astronomy

The carbon nanotube carpet is about half the thickness of a sheet of paper and absorbs 99.9 percent of the light that hits it.

New method for building a low-cost, high-performance electric machine and drive could result in huge energy savings

Prof. Hofmann intends to design, build and test a 30kW brushless, self-excited synchronous field winding prototype machine that overcomes the weaknesses of the current technology.

Colored solar cells could make display screens more efficient

Professor Jay Guo has developed the reflective photovoltaic color filter device that can convert absorbed light to electricity.

Laura Freyman awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Freyman is studying Electrical Engineering and is a member of the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory.

Powering breakthrough technologies

Ambiq Micro could revolutionize ubiquitous computing, with energy-efficient microcontrollers that are 10 times more energy efficient than conventional microprocessors.

New laser could treat acne with telecom technology

The laser could treat acne by targeting the oil-producing sebaceous glands, which are known to be involved in the development of the skin disease.

Making smart dust a reality

This research is expected to have a fundamental and long term impact on a diverse set of applications ranging from energy conservation to health care.

Using imprint processing to mass-produce tiny antennas could improve wireless electronics

The antenna is typically the largest wireless component in mobile devices, and shrinking it could leave more room for other gadgets and features.

A minimally-invasive brain implant to translate thoughts into movement

The implant is called the BioBolt, and unlike other neural interface technologies that establish a connection from the brain to an external device such as a computer, it’s minimally invasive and low power.

Most powerful millimeter-scale energy harvester generates electricity from vibrations

The researchers have built a complete system that integrates a high-quality energy-harvesting piezoelectric material with the circuitry that makes the power accessible.

Toward computers that fit on a pen tip: New technologies usher in the millimeter-scale computing era

U-M faculty have developed what is believed to be the first complete millimeter-scale computing system, with applications in radio communication and wireless sensing.

Xi Chen and Prof. Robert Dick receive DATE Best Paper Award

The authors analyzed performance and accuracy for a variety of dynamic thermal analysis techniques and used their findings to develop a new analysis technique. Congratulations!

Paving the way for ubiquitous computing

Until now, ubiquitous computing has been hampered by the size of necessary batteries—but Ambiq Micro is changing that, with their energy-efficient micro-controllers.

New equation could advance research in solar cells

A groundbreaking new equation could do for organic semiconductors what the Shockley ideal diode equation did for inorganic semiconductors.

Zhengya Zhang earns Best Paper Award at Symposium on VLSI Circuits

The resulting 65nm CMOS test chip achieved an energy efficiency of 21 pJ/bit making it a promising candidate for low-power, high-performance applications.

Ambiq Micro: Taking a startup to the next level

“Imagine a microprocessor so tiny and long lasting that it can be implanted in the eye of a glaucoma sufferer to measure the progress of the disease.”

Millimeter-scale, energy-harvesting sensor system developed

The system could enable new biomedical implants as well as home-, building- and bridge-monitoring devices.

Mini generators make energy from random ambient vibrations

The energy-harvesting devices are highly efficient at providing renewable electrical power from arbitrary, non-periodic vibrations.

Duncan Steel will advance quantum information processes in new MURI

Steel will concentrate his efforts on solid state systems, specifically with epitaxially grown InAs/lGaAs semiconductor quantum dots.

EECS researchers receive Best Paper Award at ISLPED

The paper explores logic and memory circuit topologies for a new type of transistor in development at IBM.

Smart bridges under development with new grant

The monitoring system will collect data from surface and penetrating sensors, then wirelessly relay the information to an inspector on site or miles away.

University of Michigan Office of Technology to showcase inventions

Guo’s computer chip imprinter is one of more than 300 inventions that researchers disclosed last year to U-M’s Technology Transfer office.