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Precision Health

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Kirigami can spin terahertz rays in real time to peer into biological tissue

The rays used by airport scanners might have a future in medical imaging.

Prof. Louise Willingale creates extreme plasma conditions using high-intensity laser pulses

Willingale’s research in plasma physics advances many research areas from spectacular astrophysical phenomena to cancer treatment to fusion power.

By Cannibalizing Nearby Stromal Stem Cells, Some Breast Cancer Cells Gain Invasion Advantage

Cancer biologists and engineers collaborated on a device that could help predict the likelihood of breast cancer metastasis.

2018 Nobel Prize Laureate Gérard Mourou talks high-intensity optics

Gérard Mourou, Professor Emeritus of EECS, returned to campus to discuss winning the Nobel Prize and his work in high-intensity optics.

Extreme light: Nobel laureate discusses the past & future of lasers

Lasers of tomorrow might neutralize nuclear waste, clean up space junk and advance proton therapy to treat cancer, says Gerard Mourou.

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

With a bit of metal, nanoparticles shine in colors based on size.

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.

Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center

Scar tissue left over from heart attacks creates dead zones that don’t beat. Bioengineered patches could fix that.

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists.

Seeing through materials

By developing a fast algorithm to map out the paths light takes through yogurt, researchers aim to someday see through skin.

‘Sister cell’ profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

Michigan engineers release individual cells from a specially-designed chip using laser pulses.

Gopal Nataraj receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support high-impact research in medical imaging

Award for outstanding doctoral candidates near the end of their study.

Sensors from head to toe – Todd Coleman makes measuring health simpler

Prof. Todd Coleman’s group is tackling the challenging problem of getting high-fidelity monitoring to work affordably at home.

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new tool for making sense of the cells believed to cause cancer relapses and metastases.

Students seek the secrets of the brain in study abroad program

IPAN sent eight undergraduates to Germany for a month of lab work, learning about the intricacies of the brain.

Leaders in neuroscience look to the future

ICAN bring engineers and neuroscientists together to review the recent advancement in neurotechnology and neuroscience, define the need for next-generation tools, and enhance the translation of technology to the scientific community.

Injectable computers

With a radio specifically designed to communicate through tissue, researchers from the Electrical and Computer Engineering are adding another level to a computer platform small enough to fit inside a medical grade syringe.

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program will bring together researchers from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain.

Students earn prizes for improving image processing techniques in EECS 556

The course covers the theory and application of digital image processing, with applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics.

Cutting the cost of hearing

MEMStim’s technology is already two phases into pre-clinical testing in preparation for FDA examination. Very few MEMS devices have made it this far.

Somin Lee receives AFOSR Young Investigator Award for research in bioplasmonics

The award supports research that will help our understanding of how tissues form distinct shapes and structure to become organs, such as lungs, salivary glands, and mammary glands.

Mapping the brain: probes with tiny LEDs shed light on neural pathways

The new probes can control and record the activity of many individual neurons, and are believed to be the smallest implantable LEDs ever made.

$5M for international neurotechnology “dream team”

A “dream team” of experts in sensors, electronics, data analysis and neuroscience has been awarded a $5 million grant to help unravel the mysteries of the brain and cross-train a group of internationally-connected neuroscientists and engineers.

Glucose Monitoring with Lasers

Professor Islam is leading the reconstruction of super continuum lasers he designed to aid the military into a non-invasive tool to measure glucose in the blood system.

What makes cancer cells spread? New device offers clues

Why do some cancer cells break away from a tumor and travel to distant parts of the body? A team of oncologists and engineers from the University of Michigan teamed up to help understand this crucial question.

Mobile Friendly – apps to improve life

Technology continues to transform the health care industry, and researchers at the University have utilized mobile apps to expand the impact of their work.

Somin Eunice Lee receives CAREER award for research in nanoscale biotechnology

Prof. Lee will develop improved methods for gene therapy by delivering corrected genes directly to the cell nucleus of damaged genes.

Prof. Raj Nadakuditi awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award for research that could help reveal the brain’s secrets

His research will impact the ability to investigate the structure of brain circuits through the use of optical imaging techniques.

Mapping the brain with lasers

Yoon is leading a team that will design new light sources with lasers capable of zooming in on individual neuron circuits within the brain.

Fighting lung cancer: Faster image processing for low-radiation CT scans

This advance could be important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment.

Super-fine sound beam could one day be an invisible scalpel

“We believe this could be used as an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery,” Guo said. “Nothing pokes into your body, just the ultrasound beam.”