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Embedded Systems


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Embedded systems are special-purpose computers built into devices not generally considered to be computers. For example, the computers in vehicles, wireless sensors, medical devices, wearable fitness devices, and smartphones are embedded systems. The embedded systems market is growing 50% faster than that for general-purpose computing. 

Designing embedded systems is a huge challenge because they have so many requirements: they often need to be tiny, high-performance, inexpensive, reliable, and last a long time on poor power sources, all while sensing and influencing their surroundings. Faculty and students are applying their skills to the entire “stack,” from transistors and circuits to operating systems and applications.

ECE Faculty

Al-Thaddeus Avestruz

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David Blaauw

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Parag Deotare

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Robert Dick

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James Freudenberg

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Khalil Najafi

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Euisik Yoon

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Pei Zhang

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CSE Faculty

Ronald Dreslinski

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Scott Mahlke

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Zhuoqing Morley Mao

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Alanson Sample

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Kang Shin

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Affiliated Faculty

Cynthia Chestek

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